19th August 2011

Photo with 7 notes

Still from Nathaniel Dorsky’s A Fall Trip Home. 
1964 | 11 minutes | Color | Sound | 16mm

The second in the trilogy, it is less a psychodrama and more a sad sweet song of youth and death, of boyhood and manhood and our tender earth. - ND"Forgetting its ‘psychological plot’ this film is a fine exponent of the intrinsic magical power of cinema. Its images, which evolve in a rather unmagical sober suburb, are continually transcended and manipulated into a kind of epic haiku of superimpositions and textural weavings." - Jerome Hiler 
"In a way, A Fall Trip Home was very middle-class, actually suburban. A lot of things in it became common expressions for the next generation of filmmakers, where you make a film about your family and your home. There’s even a little bit of a re-photographed 8mm movie of my mom walking with me as a ten-year-old. But it was very askew from something like Flaming Creatures. I didn’t have a problem with it, but I was not in mode with the avant-garde scene. And then I had a long delay from making films, which ended up being smart in a way. The avant-garde scene went from the most inclusive, wild place to the most restrictive. Like all revolutions that go from the left to the right, it eventually becomes middle-class, so now avant-garde audiences will applaud politely after the worst piece of crap. When I was young, most of these films were greeted with a competition of hisses and applause…Over the last ten years my filmmaking got better, but the recognition might not have happened from within the avant-garde. People who are responsive to art forms other than avant-garde film recognized my positive qualities. My own influences also come from experiences like going to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and reading Chinese poetry from the T’ang Dynasty. Those taproots went deeper into me. Stan always used to say about his work, only time will tell if it’s art. It was a hard thing to understand when I was younger." - ND (source)

Still from Nathaniel Dorsky’s A Fall Trip Home. 

1964 | 11 minutes | Color | Sound | 16mm


The second in the trilogy, it is less a psychodrama and more a sad sweet song of youth and death, of boyhood and manhood and our tender earth. - ND

"Forgetting its ‘psychological plot’ this film is a fine exponent of the intrinsic magical power of cinema. Its images, which evolve in a rather unmagical sober suburb, are continually transcended and manipulated into a kind of epic haiku of superimpositions and textural weavings." - Jerome Hiler 

"In a way, A Fall Trip Home was very middle-class, actually suburban. A lot of things in it became common expressions for the next generation of filmmakers, where you make a film about your family and your home. There’s even a little bit of a re-photographed 8mm movie of my mom walking with me as a ten-year-old. But it was very askew from something like Flaming Creatures. I didn’t have a problem with it, but I was not in mode with the avant-garde scene. And then I had a long delay from making films, which ended up being smart in a way. The avant-garde scene went from the most inclusive, wild place to the most restrictive. Like all revolutions that go from the left to the right, it eventually becomes middle-class, so now avant-garde audiences will applaud politely after the worst piece of crap. When I was young, most of these films were greeted with a competition of hisses and applause…Over the last ten years my filmmaking got better, but the recognition might not have happened from within the avant-garde. People who are responsive to art forms other than avant-garde film recognized my positive qualities. My own influences also come from experiences like going to the Metropolitan Museum of Art and reading Chinese poetry from the T’ang Dynasty. Those taproots went deeper into me. Stan always used to say about his work, only time will tell if it’s art. It was a hard thing to understand when I was younger." - ND (source)

Tagged: Nathaniel DorskyA Fall Trip Homeexperimental film16mm

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